Dr. David Sweet

 

Associate Professor of Classics
& Chair of Classics


Carpenter Hall, Braniff Graduate Office
Office Phone: 972-721-5288
Fax: 972-721-4088


dsweet@udallas.edu

 

Teaching Fields and Research Interests



Greek Epic and Tragedy, Herodotus, Plato

 

Latin Poetry (Catullus, Vergil, Horace, Juvenal), Cicero

 

Degree(s)/Education



  • A.B.(English), Harvard College

  • M.A.(English), University of California, Berkeley

  • Ph.D.(Classics), University of California, Berkeley
  •  

    Academic Appointments



  • Associate Professor of Classics, University of Dallas, 2004-present

  • Assistant Professor of Classics, University of Dallas, l979-2004

  • Lecturer in Classics, University of California at Berkeley, l975-78

  • Instructor in Classics, Ohio State University, l970-74


  • Other Positions



  • Dean, Braniff Graduate School of Liberal Arts (2001-present)

  • Director, Institute of Philosophic Studies (2001-present)

  • Director, Graduate Program in Humanities (l985-92, 1994-present)

  • Chairman, Classics Department (2000-01)

  • Director, Classics Program (l987-92)


  • Articles and Essays



  • “The Noose of Words in Herodotus’ Persians and Euripides’ Hippolytus,” a talk given at the Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture, December 1, 2007

  • "Catullus 65: Grief and Poetry," Studies in Latin Literature and Roman History, v.XIII, Editions Latomus; Brussels (2006) 87-96

  • “Conscience and Co-Knowledge in Hamlet and Classical Antiquity,” a talk given at the annual meeting of the Association of Core Texts and Courses, in Vancouver, April 8, 2005

  • "Catullus 11: a Study in Perspective," Latomus, Revue d'Études Latines 46 (l987) 510-526

  • "Plato's Greater Hippias," a translation with notes and an interpretive essay included in The Roots of Political Philosophy: Ten Forgotten Socratic Dialogues, Thomas L. Pangle (ed.), Cornell U.P., l987

  • "Juvenal's Satire 4: Poetic Uses of Indirection," California Studies in Classical Antiquity 12 (l979) 283-303


  • Links



  • “The Noose of Words in Herodotus’ Persians and Euripides’ Hippolytus,”

  • “Conscience and Co-Knowledge in Hamlet and Classical Antiquity,”

  • "Why We Study Foreign Languages" [Adobe Acrobat PDF - 160.47 KB]
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